Top Ten Tuesday: Books That Would Be on My Modern Scottish Crime Fiction 101 Syllabus

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by the Broke and the Bookish. Today’s theme was:

Top Ten Books That Would Be On Your Syllabus If You Taught X 101 (examples: YA fantasy 101, feminist literature 101, magic in YA 101, classic YA lit 101, world-building 101)

MODERN SCOTTISH CRIME FICTION 101

In the last 30 years or so, Scottish crime fiction has become such a HUGE part of the Scottish literature scene. Crime fiction allows authors to explore their cities and countries through the eyes of people who are constantly involved in everything going on – the police. Crime fictions authors can talk politics, economy, people, and so much more. When living in Scotland, I was lucky enough to volunteer for the first ever Scottish crime writing festival, Bloody Scotland, in its first year and work as the volunteer coordinator in its second year, and through this experience I met and spoke to SO many amazing crime fiction authors. I’m not even a teacher, and I’m getting excited about what I could teach in this class. Let’s start with the syllabus.

Laidlaw by William McIlvanney     The Falls     44 Scotland Street by Alexander McCall Smith     The Crow Road by Iain Banks

The books around which most of the course would be centered:

Laidlaw by William McIlvanney – The novel that MANY crime fiction authors credit as the reason they began writing crime fiction. (GR)

The Falls by Ian Rankin – the book that got me into reading Scottish crime fiction. I could seriously do a whole class on Ian Rankin and his novels, but I’ve limited myself to one. (GR)

44 Scotland Street by Alexander McCall Smith – More of a mystery series than crime, but it offers a different take and the whole feel of the novel is different. (GR)

The Crow Road by Iain Banks (GR)

The books we’d also discuss:

Still Midnight by Denise Mina (GR)

The Skeleton Road by Val McDermid (GR)

Glasgow Kiss by Alex Gray (GR)

Raven Black by Ann Cleeves (GR)

The Blackhouse by Peter May (GR)

Shatter the Bones by Stuart MacBride (GR)

Quite Ugly One Morning by Christopher Brookmyre (GR)

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I could seriously keep going. There are so many amazing Scottish crime fiction authors. I don’t have Lin Anderson on here or Craig Robertson, Quintin Jardine, Caro Ramsay, Gordon Brown. Okay, I’m forcing myself to stop. If you like crime fiction, you’ve got to check out these amazing Scottish authors.

Top Ten Tuesday: Freebie – Books by British Authors Americans Should Read

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by the Broke and the Bookish. Today’s theme was:

Top Ten Tuesday Freebie! Pick your own topic!

So I spent a year living in Scotland pursuing my Master’s degree and while there I interned at several publishers and worked at the Edinburgh International Book Festival, so it’s safe to say that I read a lot of books. There are a bunch of British authors that I wish more Americans would read, and I thought it’d be awesome to use this freebie topic to showcase the Top Ten Books by British Authors I Wish More Americans Would Read. 🙂 A lot of them will probably be repeats from other TTTs, but that should show you how much I love them.

*All covers linked up to their corresponding Goodreads page.

1. Anything by Ian Rankin (start with The Falls if you want to try him, which I think everyone should)

The Falls

2. The Humans by Matt Haig (I’ve mentioned this book several times on my blog. READ IT!)

The Humans

3. Grow Up and Lolito by Ben Brooks

Lolito

4. The Universe versus Alex Woods by Gavin Extence

The Universe versus Alex Woods

5. A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness (I’ve mentioned this one a few times, too, but it’s beautiful and deserves the attention)

A Monster Calls

6. The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ by Philip Pullman (This book is a retelling of the story of Christ. It was fascinating and unique; a quick read)

The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ

7. Laidlaw by William McIlvanney (okay, I’m sure a lot of people have read this, but maybe not so many people my age; this book has been cited by a lot of crime fiction authors as the foundation of crime fiction in the UK. Plus William McIlvanney is one of the coolest guys I’ve ever met)

Laidlaw

8. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

9. The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner by James Hogg

The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner

10. Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson (you know the story, but how many of you have actually read it?)

Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

Bonus:

Okay, he’s from New Zealand, but I read it while I was in Scotland: The Rosie Project by Graeme Simison

the rosie project

 

Okay. So there are ten British books I think you should read. What did you do for TTT’s freebie topic? Link me to it below!