Children’s Book Review: Art & Max by David Wiesner

Art and Max cover

This book was recommended to me by my branch manager at the library where I work. I checked it out based solely on that and the beautiful and adorable cover art.

All Max wanted to do was paint. His friend Art is an artist, so he asks him if he can’t paint too. Max doesn’t know what to paint, so Art tells Max to paint him. Max takes this literally, and this starts a really fun rollercoaster of different media.

Max may not be experienced but he is really excited and passionate about trying. He’s full of enthusiasm and he doesn’t give up. I loved Max a whole lot, probably because he reminded me of myself.

Art and Max 4

SPOILERS: Max paints Art (literally) and then must wash off the paint, which leads to Art being left with no color. Art is just an outline but he eventually turns into a pile of lines, which Max works back into Art’s shape. The first time he does it is very basic, but he tries again and works really hard and meticulously until Max is the right shape. And then comes the really fun part: Max paints Art again and Art is more beautiful and colorful then he ever dreamed of. So the pair start painting together in the end. END SPOILERS

Art and Max 2

Art & Max is about never giving up and continuing to try as hard as you can at everything you do. It’s about being passionate and enthusiastic and trying new things. Man, I loved this one. Plus, look at all of these beautiful illustrations! I could see these up in a kids’ art classroom. Also, Max is my role model. Haha.

Art and Max 7

Publication info:

Art & Max

Written and illustrated by David Wiesner

Published by Clarion Books; October 2010

40 pages (hardcover)

 

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2 thoughts on “Children’s Book Review: Art & Max by David Wiesner

  1. “Art & Max” is one of my favorite children’s books. I give a copy of it to every single three-year-old I know for their birthday (usually paired with a set of finger paints).

    This is what I wrote on my blog about Art & Max on July 5, 2012, when I discussed why I prefer “Art & Max” to David Wiesner’s “Flotsam”: “[Art & Max] is beautifully illustrated and contains enough words to add structure to the story without stifling young imaginations. I particularly like how the story encourages children to think about what art really is, giving them an appreciation for both realistic artwork (like Arthur creates) and experimental work (like Max creates). It’s wonderful.”

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